Belarus

Election results

Data on parliamentary elections, including the background, candidates, voter turnout, results and the formation of the new legislature. By default the latest election results are displayed. Select a date to view results from previous elections

Background

Election date(s) The date when elections started and ended for directly or indirectly elected parliaments/chambers. The date of appointments for appointed parliaments/chambers.
25.02.2024
Timing of election Timing of election: Upon normal expiry; Early elections; Delayed elections
Delayed elections
Expected date of next elections The expected date at which the next elections should take place, based on law or practice.
29.02.2028
Number of seats at stake Number of seats contested at the elections. Where the parliament/chamber is fully renewed, this number is usually identical to the statutory number of members. Where the parliament/chamber is partially renewed or appointed, the number of seats at stake is usually less than the total number of members.
110
Scope of elections Scope of elections: Full renewal; Partial renewal.
Full renewal

Candidates

Number of parties contesting the election This field may include either the number of parties contesting the election, or the number of coalitions/electoral alliance.
4

Voter turnout

Registration Number of people registered to vote
6,911,982
Votes Number of people who actually voted
5,055,345
Voter turnout The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of people who actually voted by the number of people registered to vote
73.14%

Results

About the election Short description of the context and results of the election.
Belaya Rus, led by Mr. Oleg Romanov, became the largest force in the 110-member House of Representatives, winning a total of 51 seats (note 1). Three other pro-president parties won fewer than 10 seats each: the Republican Party of Labour and Justice (led by Mr. Alexander Khizhnyak), the Communist Party of Belarus (Mr. Aliaksei Sokal) and the Liberal Democratic Party of Belarus (Mr. Oleg Gaidukevich ). In 2024, 37 women were elected, a decrease from 44 in 2019. On 22 March, the newly elected House of Representatives held its first session.

The 2024 elections, which were constitutionally due by 2023, were the first to be held after the 2020 political crisis (note 2). They were also the first to be held following the 2022 constitutional amendments (note 3).

The key electoral issues included relations with Russia, the war in Ukraine, sanctions imposed on Belarus, and the fairness and transparency of the elections. Only observers from other post-Soviet States were invited to monitor the election. This was the first time that observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) did not monitor the election in Belarus. Unlike in previous elections, Belarusians abroad were not able to vote. The minimum turnout to validate the parliamentary elections was dropped. Opposition leader Ms. Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya, in exile since 2020, called for the election to be boycotted.

Note 1:
Belaya Rus was initially a public association aimed at supporting the political agenda of President Aleksandr Lukashenko. It was constituted as a political party in March 2023.

Note 2:
The results of the May 2020 presidential elections, which gave President Lukashenko a sixth term in power, triggered massive anti-regime protests amid allegations of large-scale vote rigging. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) noted that, in repressing these protests, the government had committed multiple human rights violations, including the disproportionate use of force, arbitrary arrest and detention, attacks against freedom of expression, and forced exile.

Note 3:
The constitutional amendments reinstated a two-term limit for the president that was lifted in 2004. A President of the Republic who leaves office due to the expiry of their term, or prematurely in the event of their resignation, will be a member of the Council of the Republic (the upper chamber of parliament) for life. The statutory number of the Council of the Republic has thus increased from 64 to 65. However, there is no former President of the Republic, since Mr. Lukashenko has been serving as President since the office was established in 1994.
Percentage of seats won by largest party or coalition The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of seats won by the largest party by the number of seats at stake in the election.
46.36%
Parties or coalitions winning seats
Political groups winning seats breakdown
Political group Total
Belaya Rus party 51
Republican Party of Labour and Justice 8
Communist Party of Belarus 7
Liberal Democratic Party of Belarus 4
Non-partisans 40
Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
73
Number of women elected
37
Percentage of women elected The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women elected in the election and the number of seats at stake at the election.
33.64%
Women Directly Elected
37

New legislature

Total number of men after the election The total number of male parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
73
Total number of women after the election The total number of female parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
37
Date of the first session The date when the newly elected parliament/chamber was convened for the first time. It may be different from the date when members were sworn in.
22.03.2024
First Speaker of the new legislature
First Speaker of the new legislature First name of the Speaker of the new legislature following the election or renewal.
Igor Sergeyenko (Male)
Date of election
22.03.2024