New Parline: the IPU’s Open Data Platform (beta)
Your one-stop-shop for information about national parliaments

Zimbabwe

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National Assembly

This is a bicameral parliament. Switch to theSenate

Data on women

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Basic information > About parliament

Speaker

Speaker
Jacob F. Mudenda (Male)
Year of birth
1946
Additional information
Elected on 3 Sep. 2013, re-elected on 11 Sep. 2018.
See historical data for this field.

Secretary general

Secretary General
Kennedy Mugove Chokuda (Male)
Notes Additional information about the Secretary General, in particular regarding their term.
Appointed on 20 May 2015.

Members

Current number of members, by sex
Men The number of male parliamentarians who currently hold seats in parliament.
184
Women The number of female parliamentarians who currently hold seats in parliament.
86
See historical data for this field.
Percentage of women Calculated by dividing the current number of women by the current number of members.
31.85% See historical data for this field.

Age

Youngest member (years) Age at the time of the last election or renewal.
Youngest member
Joana Mamombe (Female)
Total number of MPs, 45 years of age or younger
Total number of MPs, 46 years of age or older
117
Total per sex
Total of male
116
Total of female
49
Total per age interval
18-20
0
21-30
5
31-40
21
41-45
22
46-50
15
51-60
67
61-70
32
71-80
2
81-90
1
91 and over
0
Number of members, by age
Breakdown of members by age and gender
18 - 20 21 - 30 31 - 40 41 - 45 46 - 50 51 - 60 61 - 70 71 - 80 81 - 90 91 and over Totals per gender
Totals per age interval 0 5 21 22 15 67 32 2 1 0
Total <= 45: 48 Total >= 46: 117
Male 0 5 16 15 10 42 26 1 1 0 116
Female 0 0 5 7 5 25 6 1 0 0 49
Percentage of members, by age
Age as last election or renewalOverallMaleFemale
Percentage of MPs 30 years of age or younger3.03%3.03%0%
Percentage of MPs 40 years of age or younger15.76%12.73%3.03%
Percentage of MPs 45 years of age or younger29.09%21.82%7.27%

Reserved seats and quotas

Number of reserved seats, by group
Women
60
Electoral quota for women Quotas to promote the representation of women in parliament.
Elections > Election results

Candidates

Total number of candidates Total number of people who registered as candidates for election. Does not include people who stood as candidates to become "substitute members".
1,631
Number of female candidates Number of female candidates
240
Percentage of women candidates The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women candidates by the total number of candidates.
14.71%
Number of candidates, by sex
Number of female candidates Number of female candidates
240
Percentage of women candidates The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women candidates by the total number of candidates.
14.71%

Results

Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
185
Number of women elected
25
Percentage of women elected The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women elected in the election and the number of seats at stake at the election.
9.26%
Number of women after election or renewal, by mode of designation
Women Directly Elected
25
Women Other
60

New legislature

Total number of men after the election The total number of male parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
185
Total number of women after the election The total number of female parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
85
First Speaker of the new legislature
First Speaker of the new legislature First name of the Speaker of the new legislature following the election or renewal.
Jacob F. Mudenda (Male)
Political party
ZANU-PF
Date of election
11.09.2018
Elections > Historical data on women

Women's suffrage

Date of independence For countries that become independent after 1940
1980
Women’s right to vote
National or local Suffrage: National or Local
National
Restricted or unrestricted suffrage Suffrage: Restricted or Universal
Restricted
Detail of restrictions Suffrage: Restrictions detail
European men and women only
Women’s right to vote Year in which women obtained the right to vote
1957
National or local Suffrage: National or Local
National
Restricted or unrestricted suffrage Suffrage: Restricted or Universal
Restricted
Notes Suffrage: Additional Notes on right of suffrage
Prior to independence, women were granted the right to vote under the following restrictions: Up to 1957, only men and European women could vote. In 1957, a qualified right to vote was extended to black married women. A wife was deemed to have the same means of qualifications as her husband, but in the case of a polygamous marriage, this privilege only applied to the first wife. Wives were required to have literacy in English and any educational qualifications in their own right. In order to be registered as a general voter, a person had to have one of four alternative qualifications: (i) income of £ 720 per annum or ownership or immovable property valued at £ 1,500; (ii) income of £ 3,480 per annum or ownership of immovable property valued at £ 1,000 plus the completion of a primary course of education of prescribed standard; (iii) being a minister of religion, who had undergone certain stipulated training and periods of service in the Ministry and who followed no other profession, trade or gainful occupation; (iv) being a chief as defined in the Act.
Women’s right to vote Year in which women obtained the right to vote
1980
National or local Suffrage: National or Local
National
Restricted or unrestricted suffrage Suffrage: Restricted or Universal
Universal
Notes Suffrage: Additional Notes on right of suffrage
Prior to independence, women were granted the right to vote under the following restrictions: Between 1919 and 1957, only men and European women could vote. In 1957, a qualified right to vote was extended to black married women. A wife was deemed to have the same means of qualifications as her husband, but in the case of a polygamous marriage, this privilege only applied to the first wife. Wives were required to have literacy in English and any educational qualifications in their own right. In order to be registered as a general voter, a person had to have one of four alternative qualifications: (i) income of £ 720 per annum or ownership or immovable property valued at £ 1,500; (ii) income of £ 3,480 per annum or ownership of immovable property valued at £ 1,000 plus the completion of a primary course of education of prescribed standard; (iii) being a minister of religion, who had undergone certain stipulated training and periods of service in the Ministry and who followed no other profession, trade or gainful occupation; (iv) being a chief as defined in the Act.
Women’s right to stand for election
Women's right to stand for election Year in which women obtained the right to stand for election
1980
National or local Stand for Election: National or Local
National
Restricted or unrestricted suffrage Stand for Election : Restricted or Universal
Universal
Notes Stand for Election: Additional Notes on right to stand for election
Prior to independence, women were granted the right to vote and stand for election under the following restrictions: Between 1919 and 1957, only men and European women could vote. In 1957, a qualified right to vote was extended to black married women. A wife was deemed to have the same means of qualifications as her husband, but in the case of a polygamous marriage, this privilege only applied to the first wife. Wives were required to have literacy in English and any educational qualifications in their own right. In order to be registered as a general voter, a person had to have one of four alternative qualifications: (i) income of £ 720 per annum or ownership or immovable property valued at £ 1,500; (ii) income of £ 3,480 per annum or ownership of immovable property valued at £ 1,000 plus the completion of a primary course of education of prescribed standard; (iii) being a minister of religion, who had undergone certain stipulated training and periods of service in the Ministry and who followed no other profession, trade or gainful occupation; (iv) being a chief as defined in the Act.
First woman in parliament
First woman in parliament Year in which first woman entered parliament
1980
Notes
Parliamentary bodies > Caucuses

Women

Caucus name
Zimbabwe Women's Parliamentary Caucus (2001-01)
Date of creation
01.2001
Formal or informal
Formal
The caucus is open to male MPs
No
The caucus is cross-party
No
Notes
Membership to the Caucus is open to all Zimbabwean Women Members of Parliament and Associate Members, upon payment of a prescribed fee. An Associate Member is any former woman Member of the Parliament of Zimbabwe.
There are rules governing the functioning of the caucus
Yes
Issues dealt with by the caucus
- Successfully lobbied for the inclusion of specific measures to protect women’s rights in the following legislative processes: Sexual Offense act, Constitution of Zimbabwe Amendment No. 17 Bill- passed in September 2005; Section 23 of the Lanchester House Constitution- part of the Declaration of Rights; Land reform; Advocated to pass the Domestic Violence Act and to increase women in decision-making positions. - Domestic Violence Bill, Second Offences Bill - Active participation in the Constitution making process 2009-2013; Gender mainstreaming review of existing gender insensitive legislation and policies
The caucus has a strategic plan or plan of action
Yes
The caucus has a communication plan
No
Caucus contact details