Bolivia (Plurinational State of)

Election results

Data on parliamentary elections, including the background, candidates, voter turnout, results and the formation of the new legislature. By default the latest election results are displayed. Select a date to view results from previous elections

Background

Election date(s) The date when elections started and ended for directly or indirectly elected parliaments/chambers. The date of appointments for appointed parliaments/chambers.
20.10.2019
Timing of election Timing of election: Upon normal expiry; Early elections; Delayed elections
Upon normal expiry
Expected date of next elections The expected date at which the next elections should take place, based on law or practice.
31.12.2020
Number of seats at stake Number of seats contested at the elections. Where the parliament/chamber is fully renewed, this number is usually identical to the statutory number of members. Where the parliament/chamber is partially renewed or appointed, the number of seats at stake is usually less than the total number of members.
130
Scope of elections Scope of elections: Full renewal; Partial renewal.
Full renewal

Voter turnout

Registration Number of people registered to vote
7,315,364
Votes Number of people who actually voted
6,460,515
Voter turnout The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of people who actually voted by the number of people registered to vote
88.31%

Results

About the election Short description of the context and results of the election.
The 2019 parliamentary and presidential elections, in which President Evo Morales (in power since 2006) was heading for a fourth term in office (see note), were ultimately invalidated. The election commission initially announced the victory of the ruling Movement for Socialism (MAS-IPSP) in the parliamentary elections and the re-election of Mr. Morales (MAS-IPSP) as President. Amid allegations of vote rigging, the announcement triggered post-election protests. Opposition presidential candidate Carlos Mesa, who led the Civic Community coalition, rejected the election results and called for "peaceful and democratic demonstrations". Protests involving opposition forces and many citizens demanding the President’s resignation turned violent. 
 
 On 10 November, the President resigned and left the country. His MAS-IPSP allies, who would have succeeded him in an acting capacity, also resigned. They included Vice President Álvaro García Linera, Senate President Adriana Salvatierra and the Speaker of the Chamber of Deputies Víctor Ezequiel Borda Belzu. Other MAS-IPSP members resigned from parliament, which reportedly deprived the Senate of a quorum. 
 
 On 11 November, the second Vice President of the Senate , Jeanine Áñez, announced that she would assume the offices of President of the Senate and interim President of the Republic as of 12 November. On 14 November, the outgoing Chamber of Deputies and the Senate respectively elected Mr. Simón Sergio Choque Siñani (MAS-IPSP) and Ms. Mónica Eva Copa Murga (MAS-IPSP) as their new presiding officers.
 
 On 24 November 2019, interim President Áñez promulgated the Law on the Exceptional and Transitional Regime for the Conduct of General Elections, invalidating the general elections held on 20 October 2019. Fresh general elections – for both the Plurinational Legislative Assembly and the Presidency – are expected to be held on 3 May 2020.
 
 Note:
 On 21 February 2016, a referendum aiming at lifting the two-term limits for the President and the Vice President (introduced under the 2009 Constitution) was rejected. However, in December 2018, the Supreme Electoral Tribunal (TSE) ruled that Mr. Morales had the right to run again in 2019, upholding the 2017 decision of the Plurinational Constitutional Court, which ruled that the term limits amounted to a violation of Mr. Morales’s right to run, and of voters’ rights to elect him. The TSE’s ruling triggered violent protests. Protesters self-described as "Defenders of 21 F" (21 F , named for the date of the 2016 referendum), united against the re-election of Mr. Morales. He served one term before the introduction of the 2009 Constitution and two terms under the 2009 Constitution.
Number of parties winning seats The number of parties which won parliamentary representation in the given election.
4
Percentage of seats won by largest party or coalition The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of seats won by the largest party by the number of seats at stake in the election.
51.54%
Parties or coalitions winning seats
Political groups winning seats breakdown
Political group Total
Movement for Socialism (MAS-IPSP) 67
Civic Community (C.C) 50
Christian Democratic Party (PDC) 9
21 F 4
Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
70
Number of women elected
60
Percentage of women elected The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women elected in the election and the number of seats at stake at the election.
46.15%
Other notes
On 24 November 2019, Interim President Jeanine Áñez promulgated the Law on the Exceptional and Transitional Regime for the Conduct of General Elections, invalidating the general elections held on 20 October 2019. Fresh general elections - for both the Plurinational Legislative Assembly and the Presidency - are expected to be held on 3 May 2020.
Sources
https://www.oep.org.bo/
 https://www.oep.org.bo/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Separata_Resultados_Nacionales_EG_2019.pdf
 BBC Monitoring
 BBC
 Reuters
 www.dw.com
 The North American Congress on Latin America (nacla.org)
 www.web.senado.gob.bo
 www.diputados.bo
Women Directly Elected
60