New Parline: the IPU’s Open Data Platform (beta)
Your one-stop-shop for information about national parliaments

Colombia

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House of Representatives

This is a bicameral parliament. Switch to theSenate

Election results

Data on parliamentary elections, including the background, candidates, voter turnout, results and the formation of the new legislature. By default the latest election results are displayed. Select a date to view results from previous elections

Background

Election date(s) The date when elections started and ended for directly or indirectly elected parliaments/chambers. The date of appointments for appointed parliaments/chambers.
11.03.2018 to 18.03.2018
Timing of election Timing of election: Upon normal expiry; Early elections; Delayed elections
Upon normal expiry
Expected date of next elections The expected date at which the next elections should take place, based on law or practice.
31.03.2022
Number of seats at stake Number of seats contested at the elections. Where the parliament/chamber is fully renewed, this number is usually identical to the statutory number of members. Where the parliament/chamber is partially renewed or appointed, the number of seats at stake is usually less than the total number of members.
166
Scope of elections Scope of elections: Full renewal; Partial renewal.
Full renewal

Candidates

Total number of candidates Total number of people who registered as candidates for election. Does not include people who stood as candidates to become "substitute members".
1,843
Number of male candidates Number of male candidates
1,206
Number of female candidates Number of female candidates
637
The number of women candidates is not available from authoritative sources.
No
Percentage of women candidates The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women candidates by the total number of candidates.
34.56%
Number of parties contesting the election This field may include either the number of parties contesting the election, or the number of coalitions/electoral alliance.
73

Voter turnout

Registration Number of people registered to vote
36,493,318
Votes Number of people who actually voted
17,872,988
Voter turnout The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of people who actually voted by the number of people registered to vote
48.98%

Results

About the election Short description of the context and results of the election.
The 2018 elections were the first to be held since the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) signed a peace agreement in 2016 which brought an end to 52 years of armed conflict (see note 1). 
 
 The parties which criticized the peace agreement fared well in the parliamentary elections but failed to win a majority, two months ahead of the presidential polls. They include the Democratic Centre, led by former President Álvaro Uribe, which became the largest party in the 108-member Senate and the second largest party in the 172-member House of Representatives (see note 2), the Radical Change (CR) and the Conservative Party (CP), Among the supporters of the agreement, the Liberal Party (PL) became the largest party in the House of Representatives but finished fourth in the Senate. Outgoing President Juan Manuel Santos' Social Party of National Unity (Partido de la U) finished fifth in the Senate and fourth in the House of Representatives. 
 
 Major electoral issues in 2018 included corruption scandals involving public funds and street crime. The parties which criticized the 2016 agreement pledged to revise it but without repealing it.
 
 Note 1:
 The agreement was narrowly rejected by a referendum in October 2016. A revised version of the agreement was approved by the Congress in November that year. Most parties, except for the Democratic Centre, backed the revised agreement. In August 2017, the FARC became a political party named the Revolutionary Alternative Common Force (Fuerza Alternativa Revolucionaria del Común) and participated in the 2018 elections. However, it failed to win parliamentary representation through direct elections. 
 
 Note 2:
 Under the 2016 peace agreement, the FARC is entitled to nominate five members in each chamber of the Congress for the next two legislatures. Separately, a new rule grants the presidential runner-up a Senate seat, while his or her running mate will get a seat in the House of Representatives. The new measures will thus bring the total number of senators from 102 to 108, and that of representatives from 166 to 172.
Number of parties winning seats The number of parties which won parliamentary representation in the given election.
15
Percentage of parties winning seats The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of parties which won parliamentary representation by the number of parties contesting the election.
20.55%
Percentage of seats won by largest party or coalition The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of seats won by the largest party by the number of seats at stake in the election.
21.08%
Alternation of power after elections The results of the elections caused a change in the government. "Not applicable" to countries using the presidential system when parliamentary and presidential elections are held separately, to countries in political transition or where there is no party system.
Not applicable
Note on the alternation of power
Presidential system
Parties or coalitions winning seats
Political groups winning seats breakdown
Political group Total
Liberal Party (PL) 35
Democratic Centre (CD) 32
Radical Change (CR) 30
Social Party of National Unity (Partido de la U) 25
Conservative Party (CP) 21
Green Alliance 9
Alternative Democratic Pole (POLO) 2
Citizens' Option Party (POC) 2
Coalition List of Decency (Coalición Lista de la Decencia: ASI, UP, MAIS) 2
Indigenous and Social Alternative Movement (MAIS) 2
Community Council of the Play Renaciente Ancestral Black Communities 1
Community Council of Mamuncia (Consejo Comunitario La Mamuncia) 1
A Just Colombia - A Free People! (G.S.C. Colombia Justa Libres) 1
Alternative Santandereana Coalition (Coalición Alternativa Santandereana) 1
Independent Absolute Renovation Movement (MIRA) 1
Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
141
Number of women elected
25
Percentage of women elected The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women elected in the election and the number of seats at stake at the election.
15.06%
Note on the Distribution of seats according to sex
Twenty-five (25) women (out of 166 members) were directly elected to the House in the 2018 elections.
 The 2016 Peace Agreement guarantees the FARC five seats in each Chamber of Congress for the next two legislatures (2018-2022 and 2022-2026). Moreover, a new rule guarantees the presidential runner-up a seat in the Senate, while his or her running mate is guaranteed a seat in the House of Representatives for the 2018-2022 legislature. With these new measures, the number of senators has increased from 102 to 108, while that of representatives has increased from 166 to 172.
 As at 15 August 2018, thirty-one of the 171 House members were women, with one vacant seat.
Sources
IPU Group (03.04.2018) UN Women (29.03.2019) Registraduría Nacional del Estado Civil, Comunicado de Prensa Nº0119 de 2017 Americas Society / Council of the Americas (8.03.2018) BBC Monitoring Report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Verification Mission in Colombia (S/2018/279) New York Times The Guardian The Bogota Post El Espectador
Women Directly Elected
25

New legislature

Total number of men after the election The total number of male parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
141
Total number of women after the election The total number of female parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
25
First-term parliamentarians The number of members who are assuming their parliamentary mandate for the first time following the election or renewal, regardless of their mode of designation.
120
Date of the first session The date when the newly elected parliament/chamber was convened for the first time. It may be different from the date when members were sworn in.
20.07.2018
First Speaker of the new legislature
First Speaker of the new legislature First name of the Speaker of the new legislature following the election or renewal.
Alejandro Carlos Chacón (Male)
Political party
Liberal Party (PL)
Date of election
20.07.2018