New Parline: the IPU’s Open Data Platform (beta)
Your one-stop-shop for information about national parliaments

Estonia

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The Estonian Parliament

Election results

Data on parliamentary elections, including the background, candidates, voter turnout, results and the formation of the new legislature. By default the latest election results are displayed. Select a date to view results from previous elections

Background

Election date(s) The date when elections started and ended for directly or indirectly elected parliaments/chambers. The date of appointments for appointed parliaments/chambers.
03.03.2019
Timing of election Timing of election: Upon normal expiry; Early elections; Delayed elections
Upon normal expiry
Expected date of next elections The expected date at which the next elections should take place, based on law or practice.
05.03.2023
Number of seats at stake Number of seats contested at the elections. Where the parliament/chamber is fully renewed, this number is usually identical to the statutory number of members. Where the parliament/chamber is partially renewed or appointed, the number of seats at stake is usually less than the total number of members.
101
Scope of elections Scope of elections: Full renewal; Partial renewal.
Full renewal

Candidates

Total number of candidates Total number of people who registered as candidates for election. Does not include people who stood as candidates to become "substitute members".
1,099
Number of male candidates Number of male candidates
746
Number of female candidates Number of female candidates
353
Percentage of women candidates The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women candidates by the total number of candidates.
32.12%

Voter turnout

Registration Number of people registered to vote
887,419
Votes Number of people who actually voted
565,028
Voter turnout The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of people who actually voted by the number of people registered to vote
63.67%

Results

About the election Short description of the context and results of the election.
The Reform Party, now led by Ms. Kaja Kallas, remained the largest party in the 101-member Parliament, taking 34 seats, eight more than Prime Minister Jüri Ratas’s Centre Party (see note 1). The Conservative People's Party (EKRE), a Eurosceptic far-right party, led by Mr. Mart Helme, nearly tripled its share to 21 seats. On 5 April, President Kersti Kaljulaid tasked Ms. Kallas with forming a new government. However, on 15 April, she failed to receive parliamentary backing to be granted the authority to form a government. The President then tasked the outgoing Prime Minister Ratas with forming a government. His coalition government, formed on 29 April, comprises his Centre Party, the EKRE and the Pro Patria (Isamaa Erakond), which jointly hold 55 seats (see note 2) in the 101-member parliament. It is the first government comprising the EKRE. During the election campaign, both the Reform Party and the Centre Party – which have alternated in power since Estonia's independence from the Soviet Union in 1991 – focused on tax changes. The Reform Party promised to create more jobs while the Centre Party focused on measures to boost State revenues. The EKRE, for its part, led an anti-immigrant campaign, warning of an upsurge in crime. Note 1: Following the previous elections in 2014, the Reform Party’s former leader, Mr. Taavi Rõivas, had formed a coalition government with the Estonian Social Democratic Party (SDE) and the Pro Patria and Res Publica Union (IRL). However, he lost a confidence vote in November 2016 after the SDE and the IRL left the coalition. Mr. Ratas’s Centre Party formed a coalition government with the SDE and IRL later in the same month. The IRL was renamed Pro Patria (Isamaa Erakond) in 2018. Note 2: One member resigned from the Centre Party and became independent. The coalition thus held 55 seats, instead of 56.
Number of parties winning seats The number of parties which won parliamentary representation in the given election.
5
Percentage of seats won by largest party or coalition The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of seats won by the largest party by the number of seats at stake in the election.
33.66%
Alternation of power after elections The results of the elections caused a change in the government. "Not applicable" to countries using the presidential system when parliamentary and presidential elections are held separately, to countries in political transition or where there is no party system.
Not applicable
Note on the alternation of power
The composition of the government changed between general elections.
Number of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
3
Names of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
Centre Party, Conservative People's Party (EKRE), Pro Patria (Isamaa Erakond)
Parties or coalitions winning seats
Political groups winning seats breakdown
Political group Total
Reform Party 34
Centre Party 26
Conservative People's Party (EKRE) 19
Pro Patria (Isamaa Erakond) 12
Estonian Social Democratic Party (SDE) 10
Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
71
Number of women elected
30
Percentage of women elected The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women elected in the election and the number of seats at stake at the election.
29.7%
Sources
The Estonian Parliament (13.03.2019, 29.04.2019) State Electoral Office of Estonia (04.07.2019) https://www.valimised.ee/en https://www.valitsus.ee ERR News BBC Monitoring BBC Deutsche Welle Baltic News Network
Women Directly Elected
30

New legislature

Total number of men after the election The total number of male parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
71
Total number of women after the election The total number of female parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
30
Date of the first session The date when the newly elected parliament/chamber was convened for the first time. It may be different from the date when members were sworn in.
04.04.2019
First Speaker of the new legislature
First Speaker of the new legislature First name of the Speaker of the new legislature following the election or renewal.
Henn Põlluaas (Male)
Political party
Conservative People's Party (EKRE)
Date of election
04.04.2019