Guinea-Bissau

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People's National Assembly

Election results

Data on parliamentary elections, including the background, candidates, voter turnout, results and the formation of the new legislature. By default the latest election results are displayed. Select a date to view results from previous elections

Background

Election date(s) The date when elections started and ended for directly or indirectly elected parliaments/chambers. The date of appointments for appointed parliaments/chambers.
10.03.2019
Timing of election Timing of election: Upon normal expiry; Early elections; Delayed elections
Delayed elections
Expected date of next elections The expected date at which the next elections should take place, based on law or practice.
31.03.2023
Number of seats at stake Number of seats contested at the elections. Where the parliament/chamber is fully renewed, this number is usually identical to the statutory number of members. Where the parliament/chamber is partially renewed or appointed, the number of seats at stake is usually less than the total number of members.
102
Scope of elections Scope of elections: Full renewal; Partial renewal.
Full renewal

Candidates

The number of women candidates is not available from authoritative sources.
Number of parties contesting the election This field may include either the number of parties contesting the election, or the number of coalitions/electoral alliance.
21

Voter turnout

Registration Number of people registered to vote
761,676
Votes Number of people who actually voted
645,085
Voter turnout The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of people who actually voted by the number of people registered to vote
84.69%

Results

About the election Short description of the context and results of the election.
Former Prime Minister Domingos Simoes Pereira’s African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC) remained the largest party in the 102-member People's National Assembly. The Movement for a Democratic Alternative (MADEM-G.15, which comprises former PAIGC members), led by Mr. Braima Camara, and the Party for Social Renovation (PRS), which respectively came second and third, signed an agreement to form an opposition bloc in the new legislature. 
 
 The PAIGC subsequently signed a coalition agreement with three other parties (see note), giving it a total of 54 seats. However, when Mr. Camara (MADEM-G15) was not elected as the first vice-speaker, President José Mário Vaz refused to name a new prime minister stating that the post of the first vice-speaker had to be filled before the appointment of the prime minister. The PAIGC contested the decision arguing that the fact that there was no vice-speaker did not prevent the appointment of the prime minister. On 22 May, thousands of PAIGC supporters protested in the capital, calling on the President to nominate Mr. Pereira as prime minister. Following mounting pressure, the President asked the PAIGC to nominate a premier candidate. The PAIGC named Mr. Pereira. However, on 17 June, the President, without giving a reason, asked Parliament to nominate someone else. The PAIGC subsequently nominated as its new premiership candidate Mr. Aristides Gomes (PAIGC) who has been in the post since April 2018. 
 
 Under the Constitution, the President has to approve both the prime minister and the new government. On 19 June, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) gave Guinea-Bissau a deadline of 23 June (when the President’s five-year term was due to end) to name the new prime minister proposed by the parliamentary majority and to form a new government, or face sanctions. On 22 June, President Vaz approved Mr. Gomes (PAIGC) as prime minister. Although Mr. Gomes handed a list of his Cabinet to the President, the President did not approve the list before the end of his presidential term on 23 June, plunging the country into a power vacuum.
 
 On 27 June, the People's National Assembly elected Speaker Cipriano Cassamá as interim President of the Republic. On 29 June, Attorney General Bacar Biai issued an arrest order against the Speaker, for “attempting to subvert the constitutional order”. On 29 June, ECOWAS urged President Vaz to appoint the Government and a new Attorney General by 3 July 2019. ECOWAS also urged Mr. Vaz to leave the full management of government affairs to the newly formed Government while noting he would stay in office until the next presidential election (expected to be held on 24 November). 
 
 On 2 July, Attorney General Biai submitted his resignation to President Vaz “for the sake of peace and stability”. On 3 July, the President also appointed a new Cabinet under Mr. Gomes. It includes 16 ministers – 8 men and 8 women – as well as 15 deputy ministers; 23 from PAIGC members and six members from its earlier referred to three allies. The President also appointed Mr. Ladislau Clemente Fernando Embassa as new Attorney General.
 
 The delayed elections in 2019 followed a period of political crisis, triggered in August 2015 by the dismissal of the then Prime Minister Pereira by President Vaz. The crisis deepened in early 2016 when PAIGC expelled 15 of its members who supported the new Prime Minister, which then led to their dismissal from Parliament. In April 2016, the Supreme Court declared the Parliament’s decision to expel the 15 parliamentarians unconstitutional.
 
 An agreement to end the crisis, brokered by ECOWAS, was reached in April 2018. President Vaz appointed Mr. Gomes as a new consensus Prime Minister, paving the way for the National Assembly to meet for the first time since January 2016. It extended its term - which was due to expire on 23 April 2018 - until the proclamation of the results of the new parliamentary elections expected to be held on 18 November 2018. Due mainly to delays of finalizing the census and voter registration, parliamentary elections were postponed several times to 10 March 2019.
 
 Note:
 The United People's Assembly - Democratic Party of Guinea-Bissau (APU-PDGB), the Union for Change (UM) and the New Democracy Party (PND).
Number of parties winning seats The number of parties which won parliamentary representation in the given election.
6
Percentage of parties winning seats The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of parties which won parliamentary representation by the number of parties contesting the election.
28.57%
Percentage of seats won by largest party or coalition The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of seats won by the largest party by the number of seats at stake in the election.
46.08%
Alternation of power after elections The results of the elections caused a change in the government. "Not applicable" to countries using the presidential system when parliamentary and presidential elections are held separately, to countries in political transition or where there is no party system.
Not applicable
Number of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
4
Names of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC), United People's Assembly - Democratic Party of Guinea-Bissau (APU-PDGB), Union for Change (UM), New Democracy Party (NDP)
Parties or coalitions winning seats
Political groups winning seats breakdown
Political group Total
African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC) 47
Movement for a Democratic Alternative (MADEM G.15) 27
Party for Social Renovation (PRS) 21
United People's Assembly - Democratic Party of Guinea-Bissau (APU-PDGB) 5
Union for Change (UM ) 1
New Democracy Party (PND) 1
Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
88
Number of women elected
14
Percentage of women elected The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women elected in the election and the number of seats at stake at the election.
13.73%
Sources
People's National Assembly (21.03.2019)
 http://cne.gw/
 https://news.un.org 
 https://uniogbis.unmissions.org/
 BBC Monitoring
 Le Monde
 Deutsche Welle
 africanews.
 Apanews
 Club of Mozambique
 http://www.ecowas.int
Women Directly Elected
14

New legislature

Total number of women after the election The total number of female parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
14
Date of the first session The date when the newly elected parliament/chamber was convened for the first time. It may be different from the date when members were sworn in.
18.04.2019
First Speaker of the new legislature
First Speaker of the new legislature First name of the Speaker of the new legislature following the election or renewal.
Cipriano Cassamá (Male)
Political party
African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC)
Date of election
18.04.2019