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Guyana

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Parliament of the Co-operative Republic of Guyana

Election results

Data on parliamentary elections, including the background, candidates, voter turnout, results and the formation of the new legislature. By default the latest election results are displayed. Select a date to view results from previous elections

Background

Election date(s) The date when elections started and ended for directly or indirectly elected parliaments/chambers. The date of appointments for appointed parliaments/chambers.
11.05.2015
Date of dissolution of the outgoing legislature Date at which the previous legislature (elected at the previous elections) was dissolved.
28.02.2015
Timing of election Timing of election: Upon normal expiry; Early elections; Delayed elections
Early election
Expected date of next elections The expected date at which the next elections should take place, based on law or practice.
31.05.2020
Number of seats at stake Number of seats contested at the elections. Where the parliament/chamber is fully renewed, this number is usually identical to the statutory number of members. Where the parliament/chamber is partially renewed or appointed, the number of seats at stake is usually less than the total number of members.
65
Scope of elections Scope of elections: Full renewal; Partial renewal.
Full renewal

Candidates

Number of parties contesting the election This field may include either the number of parties contesting the election, or the number of coalitions/electoral alliance.
7

Voter turnout

Registration Number of people registered to vote
570,708
Votes Number of people who actually voted
412,012
Voter turnout The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of people who actually voted by the number of people registered to vote
72.19%

Results

About the election Short description of the context and results of the election.
The Partnership for National Unity - Alliance for Change coalition (APNU-AFC, see note), led by former army general David Granger, narrowly won both parliamentary and presidential elections, thereby ending the People's Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C)'s 23-year rule. Outgoing President Donald Ramotar (PPP/C), who lost to Mr. Granger, claimed the elections had been rigged and demanded a recount. International observers said the elections were free and fair. On 16 May, Mr. Granger was sworn in as the new President. The major electoral issues were measures to tackle the high crime rate, unemployment, corruption as well as drug and human trafficking. The early elections followed the prorogation of parliament by the President in November 2014, in an apparent attempt to avoid a vote of no confidence against his minority government. A motion had been tabled in August by the AFC, which accused the PPP/C of corruption, mismanagement and lack of transparency, and a successful vote would have seen the dissolution of parliament and early elections. In January 2015, the President announced the holding of early parliamentary elections, stating that the prorogation of parliament had not eased tensions between the parliamentary parties. Note: In the previous elections held in 2011, the APNU and the AFC fielded candidates separately and won a total of 33 seats. This was one more than the PPP/C, which failed to secure a parliamentary majority for the first time in 19 years. Mr. Ramotar subsequently formed a minority PPP/C government, the first since Guyana gained independence from the United Kingdom in 1966. In 2015, the APNU and the AFC submitted a joint candidate list.
Number of parties winning seats The number of parties which won parliamentary representation in the given election.
2
Percentage of parties winning seats The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of parties which won parliamentary representation by the number of parties contesting the election.
28.57%
Percentage of seats won by largest party or coalition The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of seats won by the largest party by the number of seats at stake in the election.
50.77%
Alternation of power after elections The results of the elections caused a change in the government. "Not applicable" to countries using the presidential system when parliamentary and presidential elections are held separately, to countries in political transition or where there is no party system.
Yes
Number of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
1
Names of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
A Partnership for National Unity - Alliance for Change (APNU-AFC)
Parties or coalitions winning seats
Political groups winning seats breakdown
Political group Total
A Partnership for National Unity - Alliance for Change (APNU-AFC) 33
People's Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C) 32
Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
48
Number of women elected
21
Percentage of women elected The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women elected in the election and the number of seats at stake at the election.
32.31%
Note on the Distribution of seats according to sex
The statistics above refer to the 65 directly-elected seats. As at 12 June 2015, 37 members from the government had been sworn in: - 33 directly-elected members (including 13 women) from - A Partnership for National Unity - Alliance for Change (APNU-AFC); - three non-elected ministers and; - the Speaker, a non-elected member, who became an ex officio member of the National Assembly. - 32 members of the People's Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C), including nine women, were sworn in on 17 August, bringing the number of women to 21 out of a total of 69 members.
Other notes
Date of dissolution of the outgoing legislature: 28 February 2015. The dissolution of the outgoing legislature was constitutionally due by 12 February 2015, three months ahead of the polling day. Number of parties winning seats: 2 (including one coalition) Number of parties in government: One coalition including two parties Speaker: Mr. Barton Scotland (non-elected member)
Sources
National Assembly (12.06.2015, 01.09.2015, 01.01.2017)
Women Directly Elected
21

New legislature

Total number of men after the election The total number of male parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
48
Total number of women after the election The total number of female parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
21
First-term parliamentarians The number of members who are assuming their parliamentary mandate for the first time following the election or renewal, regardless of their mode of designation.
20
Date of the first session The date when the newly elected parliament/chamber was convened for the first time. It may be different from the date when members were sworn in.
10.06.2015
First Speaker of the new legislature
First Speaker of the new legislature First name of the Speaker of the new legislature following the election or renewal.
Barton Scotland (Male)