New Parline: the IPU’s Open Data Platform (beta)
Your one-stop-shop for information about national parliaments

Indonesia

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House of Representatives

Election results

Data on parliamentary elections, including the background, candidates, voter turnout, results and the formation of the new legislature. By default the latest election results are displayed. Select a date to view results from previous elections

Background

Election date(s) The date when elections started and ended for directly or indirectly elected parliaments/chambers. The date of appointments for appointed parliaments/chambers.
17.04.2019
Timing of election Timing of election: Upon normal expiry; Early elections; Delayed elections
Upon normal expiry
Expected date of next elections The expected date at which the next elections should take place, based on law or practice.
30.04.2024
Number of seats at stake Number of seats contested at the elections. Where the parliament/chamber is fully renewed, this number is usually identical to the statutory number of members. Where the parliament/chamber is partially renewed or appointed, the number of seats at stake is usually less than the total number of members.
575
Scope of elections Scope of elections: Full renewal; Partial renewal.
Full renewal

Candidates

Number of parties contesting the election This field may include either the number of parties contesting the election, or the number of coalitions/electoral alliance.
16

Results

About the election Short description of the context and results of the election.
The ruling coalition and its allies supporting President Joko Widodo (see note 1) won the elections, taking a total of 349 seats in the 575-member House of Representatives (see note 2). In the opposition camp, the Great Indonesia Movement (Gerindra), led by former military general Prabowo Subianto, came first with 78 seats. Its allies – the Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) and the National Mandate Party (PAN) – took 94 seats. In the presidential elections, the incumbent President Widodo, who had picked an influential Islamic cleric Ma’ruf Amin as his running mate, defeated Mr. Prabowo. Mr. Widodo campaigned on the government’s records, citing in particular poverty reduction, economic growth and infrastructure work in Jakarta. Mr. Prabowo rejected the presidential election results, arguing that he was the victim of "structural, systematic and massive" fraud. On 27 June, the Constitutional Court rejected the claim, thereby confirming Mr. Widodo’s victory. In 2019, Indonesia, which has 187 million registered voters and is made up of 18,000 islands - held presidential, national and regional elections in one single day (see note 3). The election commission claimed that over 550 of some 7.3 million election personnel died due to overwork related conditions. The Government announced it would evaluate the 2019 elections after the new government is sworn in. Note 1: The coalition is led by the Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P) of former President Megawati Sukarnoputri. In addition, the President received the support of the Party of Functional Groups (Golkar ), the National Democratic Party (NasDem), the National Awakening Party (PKB), and the United Development Party (PPP ). Note 2: The statutory number of the House of Representatives has increased from 560 to 575 due to the formation of a new province, North Kalimantan (which has three seats) and 12 additional seats allotted to eight other provinces due to demographic change. Note 3: From 2004 to 2014, presidential elections were held three months after parliamentary elections. The results of the parliamentary elections determined which parties could put up candidates for the presidential election. In 2013, the Coalition of Civil Society for Simultaneous Elections challenged the electoral law and filed a judicial review petition with the Constitutional Court. The Coalition said simultaneous elections would improve voter turnout, save money and strengthen the country’s presidential system. In January 2014, the Constitutional Court ruled in favour of the petitioners and ordered simultaneous elections as of 2019. Presidential candidates still need the support of parties commanding at least 20% of seats in the outgoing House of Representatives or those which had secured 25% of the votes in the previous parliamentary election.
Number of parties winning seats The number of parties which won parliamentary representation in the given election.
9
Percentage of parties winning seats The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of parties which won parliamentary representation by the number of parties contesting the election.
56.25%
Percentage of seats won by largest party or coalition The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of seats won by the largest party by the number of seats at stake in the election.
22.26%
Alternation of power after elections The results of the elections caused a change in the government. "Not applicable" to countries using the presidential system when parliamentary and presidential elections are held separately, to countries in political transition or where there is no party system.
No
Number of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
5
Names of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P), Party of Functional Groups (Golkar), National Democratic Party (NasDem), National Awakening Party (PKB), United Development Party (PPP)
Parties or coalitions winning seats
Political groups winning seats breakdown
Political group Total
Indonesian Democratic Party - Struggle (PDI-P) 128
Party of Functional Groups (Golkar) 85
Great Indonesia Movement (Gerindra) 78
National Democratic Party (NasDem) 59
National Awakening Party (PKB) 58
Democratic Party (PD) 54
Prosperous Justice Party (PKS) 50
National Mandate Party (PAN) 44
United Development Party (PPP) 19
Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
475
Number of women elected
100
Percentage of women elected The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women elected in the election and the number of seats at stake at the election.
17.39%
Sources
House of Representatives (18.09.2019, 24.09.2019) BBC BBC Monitoring The Jakarta Post The Australia-Indonesia Centre The New York Times
Women Directly Elected
100

New legislature

Total number of men after the election The total number of male parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
475
Total number of women after the election The total number of female parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
100
Date of the first session The date when the newly elected parliament/chamber was convened for the first time. It may be different from the date when members were sworn in.
01.10.2019
First Speaker of the new legislature
First Speaker of the new legislature First name of the Speaker of the new legislature following the election or renewal.
Puan Maharani (Female)
Political party
Indonesian Democratic Party - Struggle (PDI-P)
Date of election
02.10.2019