Japan

Election results

Data on parliamentary elections, including the background, candidates, voter turnout, results and the formation of the new legislature. By default the latest election results are displayed. Select a date to view results from previous elections

Background

Election date(s) The date when elections started and ended for directly or indirectly elected parliaments/chambers. The date of appointments for appointed parliaments/chambers.
21.07.2019
Timing of election Timing of election: Upon normal expiry; Early elections; Delayed elections
Upon normal expiry
Expected date of next elections The expected date at which the next elections should take place, based on law or practice.
31.07.2022
Number of seats at stake Number of seats contested at the elections. Where the parliament/chamber is fully renewed, this number is usually identical to the statutory number of members. Where the parliament/chamber is partially renewed or appointed, the number of seats at stake is usually less than the total number of members.
124
Scope of elections Scope of elections: Full renewal; Partial renewal.
Partial renewal

Candidates

Total number of candidates Total number of people who registered as candidates for election. Does not include people who stood as candidates to become "substitute members".
370
Number of male candidates Number of male candidates
266
Number of female candidates Number of female candidates
104
Percentage of women candidates The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women candidates by the total number of candidates.
28.11%

Voter turnout

Registration Number of people registered to vote
105,886,064
Votes Number of people who actually voted
51,666,697
Voter turnout The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of people who actually voted by the number of people registered to vote
48.79%

Results

About the election Short description of the context and results of the election.
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) and its ally, Komeito, retained the majority in the House of Councillors (see note 1) after the half renewal in 2019. However, the number of MPs backing constitutional amendments in the upper chamber did not reach two-thirds of its members (see note 2). The main opposition, the Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan (CDPJ, de facto successor of the Democratic Party), led by Mr. Yukio Edano, remained the second largest force. Two severly disabled candidates were elected under the ticket of Reiwa Shinsengumi, led by Mr. Tarō Yamamoto, triggering urgent renovation work in the House of Councillors to enable them to carry out their parliamentary activities. A record 104 women (28.11%) ran for the 2019 elections, of whom 28 were successful, the same number as in the previous election in 2016. Turnout in 2019 did not reach 50 per cent, recording the second lowest figures after the Second World War.
 
 The 2019 elections were the first to be held after the start of the Reiwa era in May 2019. Many parties pledged to renew their commitment for democracy in the new era. During the election campaign, the major parties focused on the Government’s plan to raise the consumption tax from 8 to 10 per cent in October 2019. The ruling coalition claimed the tax hike was necessary for expanded child-care support while opposition parties, such as the CDPJ, opposed the tax hike, arguing that households had to be protected. Other key electoral issues included constitutional amendments, the country’s defence policies amid nuclear and missile tests of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.
 
 Note 1: 
 In accordance with amendments to the electoral law, promulgated on 25 July 2018, the number of members elected under the majority system has increased from 146 to 148, and those elected under the proportional system increased from 96 to 100. Accordingly, the total number of members of the House of Councillors has increased from 242 to 248.
 The new statutory number is being applied in two phases. In the July 2019 elections one half of the 148 seats under the proportional representation system (i.e. 74) and one half of the 100 majority seats (i.e. 50) were renewed. The 124 new members have joined the remaining 121 members (whose term is not up in 2019), and the House of Councillors now has a total of 245 members. The House of Councillors will have the full 248 after the next half renewal, due in 2022.
 
 Note 2:
 Article 96 of the Constitution stipulates that constitutional amendments require "a concurring vote of two-thirds or more of all the members of each House" and "a majority of all votes cast thereon, at a special referendum".
Number of parties winning seats The number of parties which won parliamentary representation in the given election.
9
Percentage of seats won by largest party or coalition The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of seats won by the largest party by the number of seats at stake in the election.
45.97%
Alternation of power after elections The results of the elections caused a change in the government. "Not applicable" to countries using the presidential system when parliamentary and presidential elections are held separately, to countries in political transition or where there is no party system.
No
Number of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
2
Names of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), Komeito
Parties or coalitions winning seats
Political groups winning seats breakdown
Political group Total Majority Proportional
Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) 57 38 19
Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan 17 9 8
Komeito 14 7 7
Nippon Ishin (Japan Innovation Party) 10 5 5
Japanese Communist Party (JCP) 7 3 4
Democratic Party for the People 6 3 3
Reiwa Shinsengumi 2 0 2
Social Democratic Party (SDPJ) 1 0 1
NHK kara Kokumin wo Mamoru To (Party to Protect the People from NHK) 1 0 1
Independents 9 9 0
Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
96
Number of women elected
28
Percentage of women elected The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women elected in the election and the number of seats at stake at the election.
22.58%
Sources
House of Councillors (22.07.2019)
 http://www.soumu.go.jp/senkyo/25sansokuhou/index.html
 http://www.soumu.go.jp/senkyo/25sansokuhou/index.html 
 https://www.nhk.or.jp
 Kyodo
 yomiuri.co.jp
Women Directly Elected
28

New legislature

Total number of men after the election The total number of male parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
189
Total number of women after the election The total number of female parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
56
First-term parliamentarians The number of members who are assuming their parliamentary mandate for the first time following the election or renewal, regardless of their mode of designation.
37
Date of the first session The date when the newly elected parliament/chamber was convened for the first time. It may be different from the date when members were sworn in.
01.08.2019
First Speaker of the new legislature
First Speaker of the new legislature First name of the Speaker of the new legislature following the election or renewal.
Akiko Santo (Female)
Political party
Liberal Democratic Party (LDP)
Date of election
01.08.2019