New Parline: the IPU’s Open Data Platform (beta)
Your one-stop-shop for information about national parliaments

Australia

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Senate

This is a bicameral parliament. Switch to theHouse of Representatives

Election results

Data on parliamentary elections, including the background, candidates, voter turnout, results and the formation of the new legislature. By default the latest election results are displayed. Select a date to view results from previous elections

Background

Election date(s) The date when elections started and ended for directly or indirectly elected parliaments/chambers. The date of appointments for appointed parliaments/chambers.
02.07.2016
Date of dissolution of the outgoing legislature Date at which the previous legislature (elected at the previous elections) was dissolved.
09.05.2016
Timing of election Timing of election: Upon normal expiry; Early elections; Delayed elections
Early election
Expected date of next elections The expected date at which the next elections should take place, based on law or practice.
31.05.2022
Number of seats at stake Number of seats contested at the elections. Where the parliament/chamber is fully renewed, this number is usually identical to the statutory number of members. Where the parliament/chamber is partially renewed or appointed, the number of seats at stake is usually less than the total number of members.
76
Scope of elections Scope of elections: Full renewal; Partial renewal.
Full renewal

Candidates

Total number of candidates Total number of people who registered as candidates for election. Does not include people who stood as candidates to become "substitute members".
631
Notes
Full renewal: Double dissolution.
Number of male candidates Number of male candidates
402
Number of female candidates Number of female candidates
228
The number of women candidates is not available from authoritative sources.
No
Percentage of women candidates The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women candidates by the total number of candidates.
36.13%
Number of parties contesting the election This field may include either the number of parties contesting the election, or the number of coalitions/electoral alliance.
57
Number of other candidates Number of other candidates
1
Notes
1 undeclared candidate: Details of gender were not provided by the candidate.

Voter turnout

Registration Number of people registered to vote
15,676,659
Votes Number of people who actually voted
14,406,706
Voter turnout The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of people who actually voted by the number of people registered to vote
91.9%

Results

About the election Short description of the context and results of the election.
The Liberal National coalition, led by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, reduced its share but retained an outright majority in the 150-member House of Representatives. It also became the largest force in the 76-member Senate. The Australian Labor Party (ALP), led by Mr. Bill Shorten, increased the number of seats won from 55 to 69 in the House of Representatives. During the election campaigning, the major parties focused on the health system, child care, tax cuts and climate change.
 
 The 2016 elections followed the first "double dissolution" (see note) since 1987. As well as ending the term of office of the members of the House of Representatives, the double dissolution also brought an end to the terms of all 76 senators. On 8 May 2016, Prime Minister Turnbull (who had succeeded Mr. Tony Abbott as Liberal Party leader in September 2015) asked the Governor General, Sir Peter Cosgrove, to dissolve Parliament after the Senate twice rejected a bill that had been passed by the House of Representatives. 
 
 Note:
 The House of Representatives is fully renewed every three years. By contrast, the Senate is a more continuous body: one half of the senators end their six-year term every three years on a rolling basis. However, both Chambers may be dissolved simultaneously in accordance with Section 57 of the Constitution, in case of an irreconcilable disagreement between the two Houses. 
 
 The terms of senators, elected on 2 July 2016, were taken to have commenced on 1 July 2016. The 72 state senators will be divided into two classes: short-term senators whose terms expire on 30 June 2019, and long-term senators whose terms expire on 30 June 2022. The four senators elected to represent the federal territories will serve a three-year term as normal, and on the same electoral timetable as members of the House of Representatives.
 Source: http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Double_dissolution
Number of parties winning seats The number of parties which won parliamentary representation in the given election.
12
Percentage of parties winning seats The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of parties which won parliamentary representation by the number of parties contesting the election.
21.05%
Alternation of power after elections The results of the elections caused a change in the government. "Not applicable" to countries using the presidential system when parliamentary and presidential elections are held separately, to countries in political transition or where there is no party system.
No
Names of parties in government The government may be formed by one or more political parties
Liberal, Liberal National Party, The Nationals and Country Liberals (NT)
Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
48
Number of women elected
28
Percentage of women elected The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of women elected in the election and the number of seats at stake at the election.
36.84%
Other notes
Expected date of next elections: 
 - For senators serving a three-year term (36 state senators and 4 senators elected to represent the federal territories): In practice, no later than 18 May 2019* 
 *Under the Constitution, senate elections are due in the year preceding the expiry of these senators' terms of office (30 June 2019). It is considered that the last possible date for the next senate elections will be 18 May 2019. That will allow enough time for the completion of the electoral process before the commencement of the term of new the senators on 1 July 2019. 
 
 - For senators serving a six-year term (the remaining 36 state senators): In 2022 
 *Senate elections are held at the same time as every general election for the House of Representatives. 
 The election date for the senators serving a six-year term will be determined after the general election due to be held in 2019.
Sources
Parliament (10.08.2016, 30.08.2016, 01.01.2017) Australian Electoral Commission ABC The Sydney Morning Herald The Liberal Party of Australia The Australian Labor Party
Women Directly Elected
28

New legislature

Total number of men after the election The total number of male parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
48
Total number of women after the election The total number of female parliamentarians in this parliament/chamber following the election or renewal, regardless of their modes of designation.
28
First-term parliamentarians The number of members who are assuming their parliamentary mandate for the first time following the election or renewal, regardless of their mode of designation.
11
Date of the first session The date when the newly elected parliament/chamber was convened for the first time. It may be different from the date when members were sworn in.
30.08.2016
First Speaker of the new legislature
First Speaker of the new legislature First name of the Speaker of the new legislature following the election or renewal.
Stephen Parry (Male)
Political party
Liberal Party
Date of election
30.08.2016