Singapore

Parliament

Political system
Presidential-Parliamentary
Structure of parliament
Unicameral
IPU membership
Yes

Election results

Data on parliamentary elections, including the background, candidates, voter turnout, results and the formation of the new legislature. By default the latest election results are displayed. Select a date to view results from previous elections.

Background

Election date(s)
10 Jul 2020
Date of dissolution of the outgoing legislature
23 Jun 2020
Timing of election
Early elections
Expected date of next elections
31 Jul 2025
Number of seats at stake
93
Scope of elections
Full renewal

Candidates

Number of parties contesting the election
11
Total number of candidates
192
Number of male candidates
152
Number of female candidates
40
Percentage of women candidates
20.8%

Voter turnout

Registered voters
2,651,435
Voters
2,540,359
Voter turnout
95.8%

Results

About the election

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong’s People's Action Party (PAP) won the elections, taking 83 of the 93 seats at stake (see note 1). The Workers' Party (WPS, the main opposition party led by Mr. Pritam Singh) took the 10 remaining seats while the Progress Singapore Party (PSP, founded in 2019 by former PAP MP Tan Cheng Bock) received two non-constituency seats.

On 23 June, Prime Minster Lee announced early elections (see note 2), stating they should be held when “things are relatively stable”, referring to the COVID-19 pandemic. President Halimah Yacob dissolved the outgoing Parliament later on the same day. During the election campaign, the major parties focused on the economy and measures to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic. The PAP, which ran on the government records, promised job creation. The WPS pledged to provide dignified jobs for workers and tackle the cost of living, Several special measures were applied, such as an increase in the number of polling stations and two-hour slots for voting to avoid crowded polling stations. Mobile polling teams took ballot boxes to citizens who were in quarantine.

Note 1:

The number of directly elected seats increased from 89 to 93 in 2020 as recommended by the country’s Electoral Boundaries Review Committee in March 2020. In accordance with the constitutional amendments, passed by Parliament in 2016, up to 12 non-constituency members (instead of nine previously) can be appointed from among unsuccessful opposition candidates who obtained the highest percentage of votes in a general election so as to ensure a minimum number of opposition representatives in Parliament. Since the Workers’ Party won 10 directly elected seats in 2020, only two non-constituency members were nominated after the 2020 elections. The directly elected members and the non-constituency members serve a five-year term.

Parliament also includes up to nine members nominated by the President. They serve a term of two and a half years. At the moment of the first session of the newly elected Parliament, held on 24 August, the President had not nominated any members.

Note 2:

In accordance with Article 65 (4) of the Constitution, Parliament’s term lasts for five years from the date of its first sitting (held on 15 January 2016 for the outgoing legislature). Article 66 stipulates “There shall be a general election at such time, within 3 months after every dissolution of Parliament”. For the outgoing legislature, those three months were to have fallen between April and July 2021.

Percentage of seats won by largest party or coalition
89.2%
Alternation of power after elections
No
Number of parties in government
1
Names of parties in government
People's Action Party (PAP)

Parties or coalitions winning seats

Parties or coalitions winning seats
Political group Total Directly elected Non-constituency
People's Action Party (PAP) 83 83 0
Workers' Party (WPS) 10 10 0
Progress Singapore Party (PSP) 2 0 2
Members elected, by sex
Number of men elected
66
Number of women elected
27

Notes:

The President nominated nine members including three women in February 2021. They will serve a term of two and a half years.

As at 5 March 2021, there were a total of 31 women out of the 104 members as follows.

- 27 women among the 93 directly elected members

- One woman among the two non-constituency members

- Three women among the nine members nominated by the President

Percentage of women elected
29.0%
Women Directly Elected
27
Women Appointed
3
Women in other categories
1
Other notes on the elections

Timing of election: In accordance with Article 65 (4) of the Constitution, Parliament’s term lasts for five years from the date of its first sitting (held on 15 January 2016 for the outgoing legislature). Article 66 stipulates “There shall be a general election at such time, within 3 months after every dissolution of Parliament”. For the outgoing legislature, those three months were to have fallen between April and July 2021.

Sources

New legislature

Total number of men after the election
73
Total number of women after the election
31
Percentage of women after the election
29.8%
First-term parliamentarians
30
Percentage of first-term parliamentarians
28.8%
Date of the first session
24 Aug 2020

First Speaker of the new legislature

Personal details for the first Speaker of the new legislature
Chuan-Jin Tan (Male)
Date of birth: 1969
Date of election
24 Aug 2020

Historical data for IPU membership

Historical data for IPU membership
Year IPU membership
2020-09
List of values for 2020-09
No
2019-04
List of values for 2019-04
No
2018-06
List of values for 2018-06
No